How Often Should You Wash Your Clothing?

Washing Machine

Here at Cache~Cachet we believe that proper garment care leads to longer garment life. Longer garment life leads to more money in your wallet. More money in your wallet allows you to invest in higher quality wardrobe pieces.

Caring for your clothing starts in your laundry room. Over washing and drying your clothing causes unnecessary wear. In fact, most luxury materials such as cashmere and wool shouldn’t be dried at all. But what about washing? How often should you wash your clothing?

Daily Washing

Let’s start with every wear washing. If you happen to get food or drink on your clothing you should wash as soon as possible to decrease possible staining. Workout clothing and undergarments should also be washed daily as they are in direct contact with your body.

Every 1-2 Wears

Garments such as t-shirts and undershirts should be washed every 1-2 wears depending on how active you are, and how easily the material falls out of shape.

Every 4-5 Wears

Clothing such as button downs and blouses can go about 4-5 wears between washing.

Every Week

Outerwear office clothing such as blazers, skirts, and pants can go a week without needing to be washed. Jumpers can also last a week or longer without needing to be washed depending on your preference.

Once a Month

Believe it or not, your denim can last up to a month without needing to be washed. However, you may want to wash them more often to bring them back to shape.

Once a Season

Outerwear garments such as winter parkas and other over jackets can go an entire winter season without needing to be washed.

 

Combine these washing guidelines with proper garment storage and your wardrobe will last years longer!

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Why Do Moths Eat Clothing?

mothdamage

By now we have all experienced the dreadful feeling of taking our favorite cashmere sweater out of winter storage and discovering it was attacked by moths. We also all know how much time and money this type of insect damage brings people every year. But do you know why moths eat clothing? Hint – IT’S NOT MOTHS!

 

Larval State

Moths cannot eat your clothes as they only have mouths during their larval stage. This state lasts about two weeks during a moths life cycle. This damage starts is when a female moth finds a suitable garment to lay her eggs on. This is usually clothing made of natural fibers. When the eggs hatch the larva begin searching for food. This is when the moth damage begins.

 

Leftover food

Larva do not eat your clothing. Rather, they eat the food crumbs left behind on your clothing. This results in them taking bites from the clothing fibers itself. To stop this damage from happening it is important to THOROUGHLY wash your garments before storing them for long periods of time. This is extra important for clothing made of animal fibers such as wool, cashmere, and fur as female moths favor these natural fibers over synthetic ones.   

 

Once your garments are thoroughly washed, it is crucial to store them in a dry, breathable area to prevent damage from mold or mildew. This is especially crucial for long-term storage! Cache~Cachet’s line of garment bags and covers were designed to allow garments to breathe during storage. All of our bags and covers contain a hidden pocket to hold our herbal moth repelling sachet. Their luxury linen lined in satin is chemical free which creates the perfect environment for long-term, high-end garment storage!

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop our luxury line garment protection here!

Read more on why moths eat clothing here!



Vintage, or Just Old?

vintage

Vintage, a term thrown around these days in thrift shops across America. But what does this term mean? Are the garments you’re buying vintage, or are they just old? The Cambridge Dictionary defines Vintage as; something old of high quality and lasting value or showing the best characteristics typical of the person who created it. This is a pretty solid answer, but what exactly is “old” and what are “best characteristics?”

How old?

Apartment Therapy says for clothing to be considered vintage, they have to be at least 20 years old. Any clothing produced 100 years ago is considered antique. This means anything produced in 1998 or earlier can be considered vintage, and anything produced in 1918 or earlier is considered antique.

Era reflection?

So we have the year down – 1998 or older. We must also consider what the definition means by “best characteristics.” Just because you have an old garment doesn’t mean it’s vintage. A garment also must clearly reflect the era in which it was produced to be considered vintage. Some era pieces include:

1990’s: flannel shirts, overalls, windbreakers
1980’s: strong shoulder pads, stilettos, gold chains
1970’s: flared jeans, block heels, Platforms

Is it vintage?

There you have it! You have a vintage piece as long as it is was produced 20 or more years ago and it clearly reflects the era it was produced in.

Keep your vintage pieces around for twenty more years by storing them in dry, breathable. Cache~Cachet’s line of garment bags and covers were designed to allow garments to breathe during storage. Their luxury linen lined in satin is chemical free, unlike traditional vinyl and plastic storage. Cache~Cachet is the perfect solution for long-term storage!

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Caring For Your Water Damaged Suede

Suede Shoes

We all know how it feels – checking the weather, seeing sun in the forecast, slipping on our suede shoes, and then it begins. . . rain. It’s no secret that water and suede don’t mix, but fear not as water won’t damage suede so long as you know how to properly dry it. Follow these seven simple steps to properly dry your suede! 

Step 1

Take your time when drying suede as it is a delicate material!

Step 2

Let shoes dry at room temperature. Added heat from the sun or direct contact with a heater can cause the material to warp.

Step 3

Stuff shoes with paper or a shoe tree to ensure they keep their shape as they dry.

Step 4

Blot shoes with a towel to absorb excess water. ONLY BLOT! DO NOT WIPE! Rubbing the shoes with the towel can harm the suede.

Step 5

Once dry, use a soft bristle brush (a toothbrush will work) to revive the hairs. *DO NOT try and brush or remove stains while wet as it will damage the suede fibers.

Step 6

Use a suede eraser to rid of any remaining stains.  

Step 7

Apply a suede protectant spray to avoid future water damage.

 

Once dry, store your suede in a dry, breathable area. This is especially crucial for long-term storage! Cache~Cachet’s line of garment bags and covers were designed to allow clothing to breathe during storage. These bags are the perfect solution for all storage needs!

 

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Caring For Your Clothing – Wool, Silk, Linen & More!

Garment care is the number one way to extend your wardrobes life. This all starts with properly washing your clothing! Should you wash them at home? Or send them to the dry cleaners? What about temp? Warm? Cold? Fear no more, as we will cover how to properly wash Cotton, Polyester, Linen, Silk, and Wool! Always make sure to check the label of your clothing as it may vary from garment to garment!

COTTON

Location: At home machine

Soap: Any

Bleach: Yes

Temp: Any (we recommend hot for whites)

Dryer Settings: Tumble dry medium heat

POLYESTER

Location: At home machine

Soap: Any

Bleach: Check label

Temp: Cold

Dryer Settings: Tumble dry medium

LINEN

Location: At home machine, or hand wash

Soap: Mild soaps

Bleach: No

Temp: Cold

Dryer Settings: Tumble dry, take out when damp to hang dry

SILK

Location: Dry clean, or hand wash

Soap: Super mild soaps

Bleach: No

Temp: Room

Dryer Settings: Towel and hang dry

WOOL

Location: Dry clean or hand wash (check label)

Soap: Super Mild soaps

Bleach: No

Temp: Room

Dryer Settings: Hang dry

 

Remember, garments need to be stored in a dry, breathable area. This is crucial for long-term storage! Cache~Cachet’s line of garment bags and covers were designed to allow garments to breathe during storage. Their luxury linen is chemical free which creates the perfect environment for long-term, high-end garments storage!

 

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Just Say NO To Plastic and Vinyl

We all have fallen victim to it. Bringing your freshly dry cleaned garments home and hanging them up in your closet with the plastic still around them. I’m not here to tell you this is the worst thing you could do, but it’s not the best.

Sure your garments will be protected from any dirt and dust, but garments need to breathe, just like you! Leaving your high-end garments trapped in anything made of plastic will buy you a one-way ticket to a future of mildew and mold. Storing garments in vinyl or plastic locks in humidity and moisture. This, in turn, creates the perfect environment for mold and mildew to begin to grow. Not to mention the chemicals in these materials will begin to damage your garments when stored long-term.

You think you’ve tricked the system by storing your garments in vacuum sealed bags? Think again!

While these bags are great for maximizing storage, they will still bring damage to your garments. Vacuum sealing your garments can cause permanent creasing in some materials, especially Linen.

Finally, don’t even think about long-term garment storage in plastic bins! Not only are these just as bad as dry cleaning bags, most people pile their clothes in and store these bins in their garage. This wet environment is an incubator for mold!

Garments need to be stored in a dry, breathable area. This is crucial for long-term storage! Cache~Cachet’s line of garment bags and covers were designed to allow garments to breathe during storage. Their luxury linen is chemical free which creates the perfect environment for long-term, high-end garments storage!

 

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!

 



The Cedar Myth

Lavender

Cedar has been a long time go to for those who want to ditch chemically filled mothballs for a natural way to protect their garments against moth damage. Plastered around the internet as the best, and the only natural way to deter moths, some even spend thousands building closets made of center trying to keep their luxury garments in mint condition. But some speculation is starting to arise. Is cedar the cure-all for garment protection?

WHAT’S THE TRUTH?

Cedar may be an effective method, but only for a short time. The fumes from cedar are only toxic to moths when at very concentrated levels. The fumes from cedar will quickly dissipate, leaving the garments in your closet unprotected from moths. Your custom cedar closet will be no match when fumes drop to a level that is no longer harmful to moths.

IF NOT CEDAR, WHAT?

Many are turning to herbs such as lavender as a longer lasting moth deterrent! Cache~Cachet’s herbal sachets were custom made by an Oregon herbalist. The fresh fumes from six herbs protect garments stored in our garment bags and covers for one year. You no longer need to worry if cedar is doing the trick. Replace herbal sachets yearly, and your garment will be protected for life! All Cache~Cachet products come with one sachet(one year of moth prevention) and replacement sachets can be purchased individually in our shop.

 

Like us on Facebook, follow us on Instagram, and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Fast Fashion – Paying the Price

FastFashion

Fast Fashion is one of the most popular trends of 2017 – The drive of clothing sales through the desire of new clothes, rather than the need. Shopping used to be done when holes were found in garments when pants became faded and ragged. Now we buy new outfits faster than we can wear our current ones.

Why is this so bad?

13 trillion tons of clothing ends up in landfills every year in the U.S alone. These cheaply made clothing items rip after wearing them only a few times. Clothing used to be donated and consigned, but now these quickly damaged clothes are finding their way to landfills, skipping second-hand stores. When these clothes sit in landfills for up to 200 years, chemicals from dyes pollute the ground, leaving the soil and groundwater beneath contaminated.

What’s even worse? The fast fashion industry’s C02 emissions are set to increase by 60% by 2030. Not to mention the risks were running with the pollutions of scarce drinking waters.    

What can we do?

Luckily YOU can make a difference! Investing in more expensive, quality constructed garments you will save money. These quality clothes will last many years, sometimes even many decades. When you want to rid of old garments, you will be able to collect some cash from selling to second-hand stores. This will not only cut back on landfill waste but give you some money to invest in new clothing.

To top it all off, you should spend some time learning proper garment care. Store you clean investment garments in a Cache~Cachet garment cover to ensure for years of protection from dirt, dust, and moths.

To learn more about fast fashion, check out these articles from Forbes and NPR

 

Like us on Facebook and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!



Moth Damage!

Moth Hole In Sweater

Summers over – do you know where your sweaters are? Your cashmere hoodies and wool pullovers may have accidentally been stored in a haunted house… Garment eating moths Attack!

This winter, eliminate the damage done to your summer garments during the holiday season with proper storages practices.  

Cache~Cachet will spare your summer garments from being a moths snack this winter season. Our moth repelling herbal sachets will protect your garments with ease so you can enjoy all the holidays have to offer. Come spring, take your fresh and protected garment out of Cache~Cachet’s garment bag for a new year of use. Saving money and a shopping trip has never felt so good!

Make sure you wash and dry your garments before storing them in any of Cache~Cachet’s products to ensure the highest level of protection.

Like us on Facebook and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here!

 



Natural Protection

Large and Small Garment Bag

Welcome to our new website! As we begin to settle into things, we want to take a moment to share not only what Cache~Cachet has to offer, but also what we stand for as a business.

As a company, Cache~Cachet believes all your garments should be stored in a safe, natural environment. We offer 5 different garment bags and covers to accommodate all your clothing. From sweaters to gowns, we can guarantee your items will be safe for years to come.

Cache~Cachet holds the health of our earth close to our hearts. Our garment bags are all natural, eco-friendly and chemical free. Our sachets are filled with lavender, rosemary, wormwood, peppermint and black pepper. This herbal blend naturally keeps your garments moth free and smelling fresh.

Storing your garments in Cache~Cachet’s protected environment will extend the life of your garment much longer than it would in traditional storage. This will not only make your wallet happy, you will also be helping to cut down on the pollution and waste from the production of fast fashion.

Like us on Facebook and sign up for our emails to stay up to date on sales, promotions, and garment storage tips. Shop garment protection here